Kicking off 'Sherlock 2 week' at Trinity Hall


Last night was a fitting kick-off to the long-awaited broadcast of Sherlock 2 which premieres next Sunday, May 6, on PBS’ Masterpiece. About 150 fans of the BBC/PBS series braved the sunny, 70 degree weather to venture out to Trinity Hall Irish Pub for a great night of trivia and the opportunity to get an advance preview of next Sunday’s premiere of Sherlock “A Scandal in Belgravia”.

A record number of trivia teams, 36 to be exact, braved the elements to compete for the distinction of claiming the title of the first-ever Sherlock themed trivia pub quiz at Trinity Hall. A huge thank you to Marius, Roger, Patrick and all the great folks over at Trinity Hall for making it a very special evening for KERA Sherlock fans who haven’t had much to smile about since season one ended back in late 2010. Special thanks, also, to the number of Tellyspotting readers who came out in support of KERA and Sherlock, including Julie Barrett, who has not only been a reader from day one, but who contributed an amazing homemade deerstalker hat as one of the grand prize giveaways. More photos from Sundays screening and more on this great hat that no self-respecting Sherlock fan should be without later this week.

The new season of, perhaps, the best television show on television begins this coming Sunday, May 6, at 8:00pm CT/9:30pm ET on PBS stations nationwide. After “Scandal…”, the 13 May episode will be “Hounds of Baskerville” and the series 2 finale will be 20 May and “The Reichenbach Fall”. Sadly, I must warn you. Savor every moment of these three episodes as from the looks of things, series 3 won’t even begin filming until early 2013 given massive commitments from those in front of and behind the camera.

  • Kevin

    Why are their “seasons” so short? Three episodes is more like a mini-mini-series.

    • Anonymous

      @f045ad30ddb6d0b8053b3fe1717e3073:disqus : Unfortunately, as is the case with 99% of the British production cycle, their seasons are extremely short. Anywhere from 3-8 episode. One of the main reasons that it has always been this way is that they employ on one writer on most series and they feel like this is a better suited way of creating great television. Instead of having a team of writers write a series and produce 6 really good episodes and 20 average ones, they would rather have one person write 6 really good episodes and never produce the average ones. Also, in many cases, the actors are so busy with other projects they bounce from one to the next and are not tied to once series like in America. For instance, in the case of Sherlock, Benedict Cumberbatch, since the last series was broadcast has been in Tinker Tailor, War Horse, Frankenstein (on the London stage), The Hobbit and is now taping the new Star Trek movie. Martin Freeman is filming The Hobbit and Steven Moffat, the producer/writer of Sherlock is also the head of Doctor Who which is currently filming. Unfortunately, it’s very frustrating for the viewer, but the ultimate goal of incredible television is the result of this way of producing. Hope this helps explain a bit.

      • Kevin

         Yes, I get that it’s a “quality vs. quantity” thing, and even *most* American TV shows have much shorter seasons than 20 years ago.   Quality shows on cable, like “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad”, at least have 12-13 episode seasons, and I’d put their quality against anything on TV, foreign or domestic.  I just think 3 episodes is a little too brief; why not, say, 6 episodes?  At this pace, Cumberbatch and Freeman will be in their 50’s before the first story arch as completed. ;>)

  • Kevin

    Why are their “seasons” so short? Three episodes is more like a mini-mini-series.

    • Bill_Young

      @f045ad30ddb6d0b8053b3fe1717e3073:disqus : Unfortunately, as is the case with 99% of the British production cycle, their seasons are extremely short. Anywhere from 3-8 episode. One of the main reasons that it has always been this way is that they employ on one writer on most series and they feel like this is a better suited way of creating great television. Instead of having a team of writers write a series and produce 6 really good episodes and 20 average ones, they would rather have one person write 6 really good episodes and never produce the average ones. Also, in many cases, the actors are so busy with other projects they bounce from one to the next and are not tied to once series like in America. For instance, in the case of Sherlock, Benedict Cumberbatch, since the last series was broadcast has been in Tinker Tailor, War Horse, Frankenstein (on the London stage), The Hobbit and is now taping the new Star Trek movie. Martin Freeman is filming The Hobbit and Steven Moffat, the producer/writer of Sherlock is also the head of Doctor Who which is currently filming. Unfortunately, it’s very frustrating for the viewer, but the ultimate goal of incredible television is the result of this way of producing. Hope this helps explain a bit.

      • Kevin

         Yes, I get that it’s a “quality vs. quantity” thing, and even *most* American TV shows have much shorter seasons than 20 years ago.   Quality shows on cable, like “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad”, at least have 12-13 episode seasons, and I’d put their quality against anything on TV, foreign or domestic.  I just think 3 episodes is a little too brief; why not, say, 6 episodes?  At this pace, Cumberbatch and Freeman will be in their 50’s before the first story arch as completed. ;>)

  • Julie Barrett

    Thank you for the opportunity to donate the deerstalker! We had a great time and ran into some friends. (That’s one of them at the front table!)

  • Rita

    We had a great time. Thank you for setting up this fun evening. 

  • Rita

    We had a great time. Thank you for setting up this fun evening. 

  • jt

    Saturday Night, 05 May 12:  I just watched my first ever episode of Sherlock.  I almost switched it off, but I persevered, and after the first 40 minutes, I managed to “get into it,” as they say.  It was okay, but it is not something I would eagerly await come Sunday nights.  Quite contrary to what the scripts are supposed to be, I found the story a bit dull and contrived.  I did think, however, that Freeman (Dr. Watson) (was it?) was the best played character.  I remember this chap from The Office.  Good actor.  Benedict’s dyed hair was a bit distracting, but over all, these are not compelling scripts to me.  I had to ask myself, if this story were simply put down on paper, and there were no actors, no special effects, no music, no costumers, and no set designers, would one find it very entertaining, and the answer for me was “no.”  Left the sofa shortly into the second episode tonight to put some trash into the dust bin out back, and whilst outside I noticed a baby opossum in one of my trees.  I immediately, completely forgot about the program and spent a few minutes considering this small little creature and how it lives, so Sherlock is not that compelling for me at least.  Once I returned indoors, I remembered I was watching it, but I switched off the sound so I could check my email, so it was not very intriguing telly for me at least.  Sincerely sorry to all you folks who think this is a smashing series.  Perhaps it grows on one if one watches long enough???  I enjoyed the 5th season premiere of Doc Martin tonight a little bit more than Sherlock.  To each his/her own, I suppose.

  • jt

    Saturday Night, 05 May 12:  I just watched my first ever episode of Sherlock.  I almost switched it off, but I persevered, and after the first 40 minutes, I managed to “get into it,” as they say.  It was okay, but it is not something I would eagerly await come Sunday nights.  Quite contrary to what the scripts are supposed to be, I found the story a bit dull and contrived.  I did think, however, that Freeman (Dr. Watson) (was it?) was the best played character.  I remember this chap from The Office.  Good actor.  Benedict’s dyed hair was a bit distracting, but over all, these are not compelling scripts to me.  I had to ask myself, if this story were simply put down on paper, and there were no actors, no special effects, no music, no costumers, and no set designers, would one find it very entertaining, and the answer for me was “no.”  Left the sofa shortly into the second episode tonight to put some trash into the dust bin out back, and whilst outside I noticed a baby opossum in one of my trees.  I immediately, completely forgot about the program and spent a few minutes considering this small little creature and how it lives, so Sherlock is not that compelling for me at least.  Once I returned indoors, I remembered I was watching it, but I switched off the sound so I could check my email, so it was not very intriguing telly for me at least.  Sincerely sorry to all you folks who think this is a smashing series.  Perhaps it grows on one if one watches long enough???  I enjoyed the 5th season premiere of Doc Martin tonight a little bit more than Sherlock.  To each his/her own, I suppose.